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Trump’s ban vs EU-Turkey deal?

In this photo taken on Sunday, April 17, 2016 migrants ask for help from a dinghy boat as they are approached by the SOS Mediterranee's ship Aquarius, background, off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa. The European Union's border agency says the number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean Sea to Italy more than doubled last month. Frontex said in a statement on Monday that almost 9,600 migrants attempted the crossing, one of the most perilous sea voyages for people seeking sanctuary or jobs in Europe. (Patrick Bar/SOS Mediterranee via AP)

 

APTOPIX Europe Migrants

Anna van Densky, OPINION

While the EU-Turkey migrant deal is on the rocks, with President Erdogan claiming political refugees all over Europe, and jailing thousands of journalists and critics at home, EU’s left and centre-right politicians prefer to criticise President’s Trump ban on migrants from seven countries at high risk of jihadists infiltrations.

The passions about Mr.Trump fulfillment of his political project looks slightly misplaced within the context of current cacophony of proposals concerning the solution of migrant crisis in Europe itself.
The EU-Turkish deal has been marked with controversy right from the start: if it is legal in the framework on international laws, and if it can be a comprehensive solution of the problem. Both questions were always left without a sound answer.
However, next to Turkish migrant route problem, partially addressed, and generously footed by taxpayers, there is a chronic problem of flows from Africa via Libya to Italy and Malta, remaining unresolved due to the fragmentation of the country after Colonel Gaddafi assassination five years ago.
The ‘failed’ state ol Libya at the doorstep of Europe, ‘the worst mistake’ of Obama’s presidency became a playground for various terroristic group, and traffickers, representing high risk for European security, is still awaiting for a comprehensive solution. Seven European vessels and four helicopters of EU naval operation Sophia are not coherent with the scale of the task: there are between 16 to 20 million displaced on African continent, according to the UN, entitled to claim refugee status in Europe. The southern Europe
is increasingly burdened with the new arrivals, appealing to relocate them among EU member-states.
The ongoing Maltese presidency of the EU continues still calls for solidarity among the EU member-states to relocate migrants, however these appeal does not meet many enthusiasts, while anti-mass migration political forces gain strength.
The eurosceptic parties regard President’s Trump policies on restricting migration as a model to follow in case their ascendency to power.
While loudly criticising President Trump for acting up to the expectations of his electorate, the European politicians presume that their own citizens share their views. The polls profiling Front National leader Marin le Pen as a front-runner for the presidency of France show otherwise.
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